Can you fly being blind in one eye?

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Can you get certified as a pilot with one eye? I am blind in one eye
and 20/20 in the other.

Thanks,
PJB

-- Princeton Jerome Bell, January 4, 2011

Answers

http://flightphysical.com/part67/Class3/67subd_67303.htm gives the standards for eyesight. The default is that you need binocular vision. There are procedures by which you and your aviation medical examiner can get around this, however, assuming that your vision is in fact adequate to the task. Budget an extra few months to get approval.

See http://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/headquarters_offices/avs/offices/a am/ame/guide/app_process/general/appeals/soda/ for example.

-- Philip Greenspun, January 18, 2011


Sport pilot?

I would highly recommend looking into sport pilot license as an alternative to private pilot. If you: - Hold a valid US driver's license, and - You were never denied a medical certificate, and - You can truthfully state you are fit to operate the aircraft in a safe manner.

Then you don't need a medical certificate to fly as a sport pilot.

-- Tal Reichert, January 23, 2011


Wiley Post was one of the greatest aviation pioneers ever, and he only had one eye.

Of course, this was before the modern FAA medical procedure. Good luck.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wiley_Post

-- Mike Zaharis, April 6, 2011


Yes, you can get an FAA Medical with monocular vision. It will require a special issuance from the FAA. Make sure you go to an FAA Medical Examiner who has experience with special issuance's, and ideally one who is also a pilot. Here is the FAA website about monocular vision:

http://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/headquarters_offices/avs/offices/aam/ame/guide/app_process/exam_tech/et/31-34/mv/

Depending on the situation, they might require you to take a flight with an FAA examiner from the FSDO and issue you what is called a "SODA" or Statement of Demonstrated Ability. This is basically a life-long exemption to fly with monocular vision as long as your good eye continues to meet the FAA vision standards. Jim Little Jr. MD FAA Senior AME

-- Jim Little, May 7, 2011