Who paid for the consequences of the ACLU-authored, Amber Heard-signed op-ed? You did.

From the New York Post:

Multiple sources said the “Aquaman” star had to switch legal representation and is relying on her homeowner’s insurance policy to cover the cost of her current attorneys in the case.

The bill for Heard’s attorney has mostly been footed by The Travelers Companies under terms of the actress’s insurance policy, sources said.

A vice president of the insurance firm, Pamela Johnson, was spotted in the Fairfax, Virginia, court with Heard multiple times throughout her trial. Neither Johnson nor Travelers returned calls from The Post.

When your next homeowner’s insurance bill arrives, remember that part of the increase will be to cover the loss occasioned by the op-ed that the ACLU wrote.

(This post assumes that Amber Heard will never pay the judgment against her and that the legal bills, as is typical for American litigation, were in the same ballpark as the amount at issue, i.e., $10 million per side.)

Here’s a question: will Travelers sue the ACLU to get its money back? The words that the jury found to be defamatory were actually authored by the ACLU, not Amber Heard. (As noted in Don’t let the ACLU write your op-eds and other lessons from the Amber Heard libel trial, the ACLU has at least $750 million with which to reimburse Travelers.)

“Anatomy of a Hit Piece” by Asra Q. Nomani (former Wall Street Journal journalist) lays out a timeline and contains some email excerpts:

From the ACLU:

“I’d like your and Amber’s thoughts on doing an op-ed in which she discusses the ways in which survivors of gender-based violence have been made less safe under the Trump administration, and how people can take action.” .. “If she feels comfortable, she can interweave her personal story, saying how painful it is, as a GBV survivor to witness these setbacks.”

The op-ed that the jury found libelous was approved by all of the best legal minds of the ACLU, it seems, including the ACLU national legal director, David Cole. And, as it happens, the version that was published was actually toned down from the ACLU’s first draft.

If you want to know why your auto insurance rates are going up, see “Geico must pay $5.2 million to woman who got HPV from sex in man’s insured car, court rules” (NBC):

Geico must pay a Missouri woman $5.2 million after she caught HPV from unprotected sex with her then-boyfriend in his insured automobile, a state appellate court ruled.

The woman — identified in court papers only as “M.O.” — said that she “engaged in unprotected sexual activities in Insured’s vehicle” in November and December 2017 and that he “negligently caused or contributed to” her catching the human papillomavirus (HPV), a common sexually transmitted infection, court papers said.

I don’t understand how the above dispute could be sorted out by an arbitrator, court, or even Ketanji’s panel of biologists seeking to define “woman.” The only way to determine that a disease was transmitted in the insured vehicle would be to establish that the woman who suffered $5.2 million in damages (nearly as much as if she’d been killed) never had sex with anyone else anywhere else. The vehicle’s DNA is not going to be embedded in the HPV that is now living inside this woman. Science says “HPV is so common that nearly all sexually active men and women get the virus at some point in their lives” (CDC), which means that the typical person who has had sex has suffered $5.2 million in losses even if he/she/ze/they did not get sued by a child support profiteer.

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9 thoughts on “Who paid for the consequences of the ACLU-authored, Amber Heard-signed op-ed? You did.

  1. I certainly hope that everyone who was riveted to the screen during the trial and paid attention to the op-ed when it was published got their money’s worth! Good entertainment is never cheap!

    I have to tune this out somehow. I keep getting this image of millions of people with multicolored hair, tattoos and piercings everywhere, sitting on air mattresses inside microhomes made from sewer pipes, staring into VR goggles while Google’s Sentient AI feeds them deepfakes of imaginary celebrity trials, smoking healing marijuana and eating soylent green out of resealable bags, while their Social Stability Stimulus checks get deposited into the ACLU’s bank account.

    • Alex says:

      “I keep getting this image of millions of people with multicolored hair, tattoos and piercings everywhere, sitting on air mattresses inside microhomes made from sewer pipes, staring into VR goggles while Google’s Sentient AI feeds them deepfakes of imaginary celebrity trials, smoking healing marijuana and eating soylent green out of resealable bags, while their Social Stability Stimulus checks get deposited into the ACLU’s bank account.”

      Yup, that’s where the world is headed.

  2. The only part of the story I like is the private Jet coming and going. I know what it takes for me to leave my house to get to the airport, I can’t imagine the logistics for Ms. Heard to travel to Dulles or Manassas, VA for her junket.

    • @JJ Donovan:

      Best unintentionally funny line I’ve heard all week. One thing’s for sure….she knows how to put the “Junk” in Junket.

  3. Didn’t the couple who had motor warts sex go to arbitration as requested by Geico and it was just the two of them looking for a solution and she said “I want $5.2M” and the mediator looked at the guy and he said “okay” and then the mediator said “gosh glad I was able to help you reach an agreement so quickly.” The mediator’s job is to get them to mutual agreement, and Geico wasn’t actually a party to that.

    The fault is with Geico’s lawyers who wrote a contract with this enormous loophole.

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